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What Is the Definition of Cut-off & Grinding Wheels?

Cut off & grinding wheels, also known as ''parting wheels'', are self-sharpening wheels that are thin in width and often have radial fibers to reinforce its sharpness.

From: Date: 2013-12-02 06:50:18Views: 2959

Cut off & grinding wheels, also known as ''parting wheels'', are self-sharpening wheels that are thin in width and often have radial fibers to reinforce its sharpness. They are often used in the construction industry for cutting reinforcement bars (rebars), protruding bolts or anything that needs quick removal or trimming. Most handymen would recognise an angle grinder and the discs they use.

The bond that ensures an efficient cut-off

Cut-off grinding, one of the most efficient and productive machining techniques for cutting plain carbon, high-alloy, special-alloy and hardened steels, offers a diverse range of advantages compared to other cutting techniques:

It cuts alloys that other techniques, such as sawing, can only cut with prohibitively high effort or often not at all. However, the process is by no means easy to command. The art of manufacturing good cut-off wheels presupposes the ability to design and manufacture wheels with the exactly right ratio of diameter to thickness. Thinner wheels produce thinner and cleaner cuts and therefore waste less material. A couple of figures clearly illustrate what “thin” means for cut-off wheels: a ratio of less than 1% of the outer circumference to the thickness is considered ideal and is therefore targeted. Thus, a large cut-off wheel with a 2,000 mm diameter would have a thickness of less than 20 mm. And, not to be forgotten, it must be tapered to permit clean, unhampered cutting. If one considers that such a thin wheel is exposed to the force created by 500 kW during cold cutting and temperatures of 600° to 1,100°C in hot cutting, it is easy to understand that a great deal of engineering and manufacturing expertise is required to build good cut-off wheels. 

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